news

T Magazine, September 10, 2017

Back in July, Carter Love at T: The New York Times Style Magazine contacted me and asked if I wanted to drive up to Sullivan County, NY, to shoot their upcoming Wanderlust column. Does one say no to T Magazine?!

The results, below. Check out the actual story here

SullivanCounty01.jpg

Callicoon Farmer's Market plums; Sunny Ruffalo in her shop, Sunny's Callicoon Pop

 

The bar at The Kaatskeller in Livingston Manor; MayerWasner, a boutique in Narrowsburg

 

The Delaware River; local flowers on display at The Debruce

 

SullivanCounty02.jpg

The Kaatskeller, a new pizza restaurant in Livingston Manor

Three Ways of Photographing a Lobster

I.
The lobster awaits the shaft of light
that hits it just so.
It ruminates its ascension.

2017_08_11_MaisonPremiere_065.jpg

II.
The distinct silhouette of a lobster
resembles
the state of the State. 

2017_08_11_MaisonPremiere_036.jpg

III.
Once food served to prisoners, 
now food served with flourish.
Different trays, same lobster.

2017_08_11_MaisonPremiere_051.jpg

##

The photos were shot for the inimitable Maison Premiere at 298 Bedford Ave. in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. 

Also, a few drinks to boot. 

Behind the Scenes, Wim Yogurt

#fromwhereistand

2 Weeks in Puglia, Italy

Julie Byrne’s song “Natural Blue” is playing over the car speakers, and we’ve just turned onto the local road that will take us from the Salentine town of Castro to the more famous Salentine town of Otranto. It’s a fitting piece to be playing, as stretched out before us is endless sky and, past the terrain of golden grass, the Adriatic Sea. I never could’ve imagined how unbearably beautiful the Adriatic Sea would be. We studied it in a range of temperaments throughout our two-week trip. It was our constant companion.

To be sure, Puglia, Italy’s boot heel with the Ionion Sea on one side and the Adriatic on the other, is not just one continuous stretch of coast and sea. Drive inland just a few miles and the landscape reveals not a trace of the watery dominion beyond. Red earth and olive trees—endless acres—dominate. This is agricultural Puglia. We spent a fair amount of time getting to know this identity of the region as well. It was quaint, winding, studded all throughout with jewels of towns as well as the peculiar stone structures called trulli. And everywhere we drove, the scent of the olive tree, assertive, sun-baked, dusty, seemed to follow.

Trulli in the Itria Valley (and our airbnb!)

Trulli in the Itria Valley (and our airbnb!)

Polignano a Mare

Polignano a Mare